Tag Archives: interior design

A Designer’s Start-to-Finish Restoration Techniques

When designing a space, we always have to start from the very beginning: its concept. This is just as important in restoration, so we take into account aspects like color, design concept, overall trend, and the final look we want to give the item.

Once we take all this into consideration and have a vision in mind, we start the restoration by sanding the piece using increasingly soft sandpaper to remove the layer of lacquer, exposing the porous base so it can better absorb a new layer of paint. However, we must be careful not to remove or damage the original color if we’re not planning to change it.

Once we have the surface painted, we let it dry completely, which may take about 3 or 4 hours depending on the materials we’re using. We like to blend the paint for a more fluid transition with the old paint, and have to consider how over time – especially if this is an outdoor piece – the brightness of the lacquer will dull.

In terms of color, vintage style tends to take bright, striking colors and contrast them with black and white fixtures with bright finishes.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits (from top): The Bella Cottage, Hudson Goods, and Deccoración

What Is the Restoration Trend?

Materials like wrought iron, steel, wood, and raw fabrics – natural materials that are aged but refined – are the most common elements of the restoration trend right now, creating an environment reminiscent of a beach or a coastal theme. The soft colors give also off a soft, romantic, relaxing look to a space.

Notice the lack of bright colors and pastels and the focus on more subdued colors like violet, yellow, blue, grey, and green.

This trend also tends to keep a more even level of ornamentation, with copper, gold, and silver items being used to accent and brighten the spaces as matte and shiny finishes broaden the sensual experience of a room without sacrificing its natural feel. This allows us to use the most modern finish possible and maximize the brightness while staying within the aesthetic.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits (from top): Hom Furniture, LexingtonLaw, and The Modern Home Design

A Designer’s Start-to-Finish Restoration Techniques

When designing a space, we always have to start from the very beginning: its concept. This is just as important in restoration, so we take into account aspects like color, design concept, overall trend, and the final look we want to give the item.

Once we take all this into consideration and have a vision in mind, we start the restoration by sanding the piece using increasingly soft sandpaper to remove the layer of lacquer, exposing the porous base so it can better absorb a new layer of paint. However, we must be careful not to remove or damage the original color if we’re not planning to change it.

Once we have the surface painted, we let it dry completely, which may take about 3 or 4 hours depending on the materials we’re using. We like to blend the paint for a more fluid transition with the old paint, and have to consider how over time – especially if this is an outdoor piece – the brightness of the lacquer will dull.

In terms of color, vintage style tends to take bright, striking colors and contrast them with black and white fixtures with bright finishes.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits (from top): The Bella Cottage, Hudson Goods, and Explore Poverty

The Right Way to Use a Transitional Trend in Design

While this trend is a little nebulous to pin down, there are certain parameters we’ll be looking at to isolate one specific design within it.

The definitive features here are the lines, colors, and shapes, and the framing style is a happy medium between traditional and contemporary, sporting some nice modern touches while still staying well grounded.

A transitional design should include furniture that has straight lines and simple curves; meanwhile the textures can be accented with well-chosen pillows, rugs, accent chairs, and vases. Some other possibilities are stands with draping and buttons, never forgetting wood as the central element. Remember to consider the ways different wood shades can complement or contrast the rest of a space.

This effect could also be achieved with metallic accents like chromium or nickel. This will help a viewer go from the traditional lines (classic textures) through the contemporary (wood and simple lines) before they see the modern metal and plastic finishes.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits (from top): madebymod.com, Tanner Interiors, and Gepetto

Using Wood When Designing Interior Spaces

People have been using wood in interior design for practically as long as there have been interiors to design. Fortunately, today, we know a bit more about the aesthetics, composition, and physical properties of wood than our ancestors.

It’s helpful to think of wood as a decorative element. Different kinds have their own unique “prints” and textures when applied to shelves, furniture, or other pieces.

Whichever kind you use, the way it’s used also makes a huge difference. Wood can help lend a lush, organic feel to a room, or the straight lines of its grains is a great way to give your space a modern touch.

Either way, wood helps any space feel warm, welcoming, and inviting. If you want to take it another step further, you can also contrast the material’s color and pattern with stylish patterns or stunning finishes. Wood is versatile and malleable, but it’s also solid and holds its own when presented in a room.

Though it might seem like this natural element that’s been around for centuries is the polar opposite of modernity, a touch of wood in an interior space gives it elegance and sophistication, suggesting a level of craftsmanship that went behind each and every piece.

Using wood when designing an interior should be a very intentional process, keeping specific contrasts and color combinations in mind to make the space look thoughtfully designed yet also simple.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits: Architecture & Interior Design

Tastefully Bringing Nature to Interiors

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People have always loved to bring elements of nature into their homes, from flowers to potted plants, but with the modern trend toward minimalism, it seems we’re seeing less and less living nature in our homes these days. However, there are still some great ways to keep these elements in even the most modern home designs.

First, realize what color “nature” tends to mean: green. Plants themselves are part of the color chart, so it’s important to consider how those shades fit into your interior color schemes. Even the shape and texture of flowers and plants have an effect on the overall trend of the room.

Plants Interior Design

For a sleek, modern look, we like to use plants that keep very straight, simple lines. Combined with the right vase or pot, this can add a note of freshness and elegance to a space, using that feeling of controlled wilderness to add a compellingly refined touch.

For more traditional spaces, we also like to use plants and flowers that come in more eccentric forms with more intricate color accents. If you do this, be careful to follow the same line of color throughout the rest of the space so it feels like a necessary fixture, not a distraction.

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Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)
Photo Credits (from top): Thomas D , Adriana Reyes Gonzalez , and Wicker Paradise

An Inside Look at Furniture Restoration

Restored TV Stand
When you’re restoring furniture for decoration, you have to be able to look past the pieces themselves. You have to consider what furniture to use for a room specifically, and forget your own individual opinions and ideals for aesthetics of room design to think about the bigger picture that piece is going to fit into.

It all boils down to the unique characteristics of the thing you’re working with, keeping in mind its limitations and possibilities. You’ve also got to keep functionality in mind – you don’t want to rework something so heavily that it loses integrity just so you can force it to be something it shouldn’t be. The above redesigned modern TV stand, for instance, kept all its functionality while still reaching a fresh, contemporary look.

Restored Dresser

For this one we thought carefully about the color and texture. We wanted something clean and fresh, so we went with a stark black/white contrast. With the color scheme in place, we played with the texture, using a glossy matte finish.

Remember that you usually don’t want a look to be too one-dimensional or stark. You want to preserve the original value of what you’re restoring while updating it to fit a more desirable trend while also increasing the overall beauty of it. It’s a give and take, updating furniture while also staying true to its originality.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)

Interior Design Tips for Using the Color Wheel

While picking the right colors for your home design might seem like a complicated matter of opinion and taste, in reality, it can actually be as simple and straightforward as elementary school geometry.

It all starts with a basic understanding of the color wheel and an idea for a starting color. Here’s a step by step process for getting interior color ideas into practice.

Pick a Color
It all starts with your accent color. Think of this like you would a person’s accent: that bit of flavor that calls your attention immediately. This is where the you is, where your personal taste shines through the most. This should reflect your concept for the room, the central impression you want to hold strong.

Consult the Wheel

Notice how the wheel is geometrically perfect, mathematically symmetrical. You’ll start with your accent color and from there, pick the other one or two contrasting colors, and voila, you’ve got your interior paint color combinations lined up!

One way to do that is to draw a straight line to the opposite portion of the wheel: your basic contrast.

Another way to do it is with an equilateral triangle. If you remember your geometry, that means each side has equal spacing, which in this case means an equal number of color units. This means that you’ll calculate the 3 perfectly opposite points on the triangle.

One more way to do it is to adjust the triangle. If you remember, this is called an isosceles, meaning two sides are equal. You’ll still start with your accent, but from there you’ll adjust the other two points so that they’re equally spaced away from the accent, widening or narrowing the triangle as you move away from those perfect opposites.

Note: this all works for the grayscale, too.

What’s Your Temperature?

Finally, consider what “temperature” you want to go for. Different colors make people feel different things, so consider what tone you want that popping accent color to convey, how you want those neutrals to frame the space you’re creating.

Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer)