Don’t Oversaturate Your Interior Spaces

When thinking about interior design saturation, the first thing you need to do is stand back. By that, we mean you need a point of reference, somewhere you can go in your interior to centralize your perspective, provide an objective framing point to assess the room.

Think of these as places where you generally access a room: a doorway or a hallway, or maybe a central point of furniture. From there, consider the way the color is laid out: where is the accent, where are the neutrals, and how much of each is there?

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But don’t stop at the walls – look to the décor for places where the color saturation plays out throughout the entire space, and consider where and how it’s distributed.

From there, it’s a good idea to get some perspective. Separate yourself and look at the space from a distance to see where color is popping out as either too heavy or too absent. Maybe certain textures start to pop out as you see the space in its entirety rather than in small parts, which can give you some ideas about ways to rearrange furniture or places to add some pops of color.

But don’t stop there – that’s only one room. Keep in mind that each space in your home communicates with each other, and that all the interior design elements interplay as you shift them.

You can be one-dimensional and do it one way throughout, but keep in mind that mixing things up could provide a unique flow for your home.

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Writing Credits: Juan Martinez (Interior Designer) and Bryce Emley
Photo Credits (From Top): Charlotte Holmes, Jurgan Leckle, Jurgan Leckle

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